A Prayer for our Freedom

“[Independence Day] ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty”
-John Adams 

Praying for America

Praying for America.

Father God,
You have granted freedom to our land and you are worthy of praise.1 You placed in the hearts of our forefathers a desire to seek Your will through independence and freedom.

I pray for our continued independence and sovereignty as we look toward You. For the gifts our Declaration of Independence speak of, “life. liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” are granted by you alone.

May we be secure in our freedom,
but never take it for granted.
May we be free from slavery,
but be a servant to Your will.
May we be protected from oppression
as we extend the provision of liberty to others,
And may we speak with honor as we honor your Word.

May we, as Christian Patriots, heed the words of Paul, who wrote:
You, my brothers, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the sinful nature; rather, serve one another in love. (Galatians 5:13)

Bless those who serve our nation and have protected her shores.
Bring protection, honor and blessings to their households.

May we be a people whose freedom is a beacon to the world of Your grace,
and may we be forever reminded of Your hand in our deliverance.
AMEN.

_________
1 Psalm 145:3

________
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.

Photo Credits:
Original Prayer Photo by: khrawlings
Original Flag Photo and editing by: Joshua J Masters 

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Praying on the National Day of Prayer (Thoughts from American Presidents)

“The Prayer at Valley Forge” by Arnold Friberg

Today is the National Day of Prayer, and it is important to remember the role prayer has played in American History. As we consider the Patriot Quotes below, be sure to find a National Day of Prayer event near you and participate. Also, be sure to read A Prayer for America and download our FREE Prayer Guide. Also, today is the last day for the special offer on Kindle and Nook editions of American Psalms: Prayers for the Christian Patriot (also available in print edition). Check it out here.

The National Day of Prayer is unique because it’s the one day that our government asks us to pray. It is the one day that the highest authority in our land gives specific prayer requests. What a great witness to the world (and to our government officials) it would be if they see God respond to the prayer requests of our president because Christian Patriots were willing to humble themselves to the authority of our nation and the authority of Heaven on the same day! In his 2013 National Day of Prayer Proclamation  President Obama has made some very specific prayer requests for the nation:

“On this day, let us remember in our thoughts and prayers all those affected by recent events, such as the Boston Marathon bombings, the Newtown, Connecticut shootings, and the explosion in West, Texas. Let us pray for the police officers, firefighters, and other first responders who put themselves in harm’s way to protect their fellow Americans. Let us also pray for the safety of our brave men and women in uniform and their families who serve and sacrifice for our country. Let us come together to pray for peace and goodwill today and in the days ahead as we work to meet the great challenges of our time.”  [Read President Obama’s full NDOP Proclomation]

Although the National Day of Prayer did not become an annual event until 1952 when President Truman signed a joint resolution of Congress, the idea of a National Day of Prayer and Fasting has actually existed longer than the nation itself. In 1775 the Continental Congress petitioned the people to pray as we formed our new country. Since then, many presidents have called the people of America to pray for the nation.

Here are a few Patriot Quotes to inspire you during today’s National Day of Prayer gatherings:

The Prayer at Valley Forge

Washington’s Prayer at Valley Forge, 
engraving by John C. McRae

There’s a great deal we can learn from George Washington’s personal prayer life, but he also made several declarations of national prayer and thanksgiving including this proclamation on January 1, 1795:

“It is in an especial manner our duty as a people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God, and to implore Him to continue and confirm the blessings we experienced.”

John Adams also called for a national day of prayer and fasting March 6, 1799:

“I have thought proper to recommend, and I hereby recommend accordingly, that Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of April next, be observed throughout the United States of America as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting and prayer; that the citizens on that day abstain, as far as may be, from their secular occupation, and devote the time to the sacred duties of religion, in public and in private; that they call to mind our numerous offenses against the most high God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore his pardoning mercy, through the Great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that through the grace of His Holy Spirit, we may be disposed and enabled to yield a more suitable obedience to his righteous requisitions in time to come; that He would interpose to arrest the progress of that impiety and licentiousness in principle and practice so offensive to Himself and so ruinous to mankind; that He would make us deeply sensible that ‘righteousness exalteth a nation but sin is a reproach to any people’ (Proverbs 14:34)”

After the Union Army was defeated at the Battle of Bull Run, President Lincoln declared a National Day of Prayer and Fasting September 26, 1861, saying:

“It is fit and becoming in all people, at all times, to acknowledge and revere the Supreme Government of God; to bow in humble submission to his chastisement; to confess and deplore their sins and transgressions in the full conviction that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom; and to pray, with all fervency and contrition, for the pardon of their past offenses, and for a blessing upon their present and prospective action…”

Two months after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, Abraham Lincoln called for another day of national prayer. His proclamation began:

“Whereas, the Senate of the United States devoutly recognizing the Supreme Authority and just government of Almighty God in all the affairs of men and of nations, has, by resolution, requested the President to designate and set apart a day for national prayer and humiliation…”

There are many more examples of our forefathers petitioning the nation for prayer. What’s important to remember from these brief examples is the importance prayer has played in the blessing of our nation. As we prepare to call out to God in one Christian voice tomorrow, pray for the healing of our nation and the wisdom of our leaders.

What activities do you have planned for the National Day of Prayer? How will you be praying for our nation?

.

_______
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.
Quotes Source: America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations by William J. Federer, 
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Public Domain Collection

A Prayer for our Freedom

“[Independence Day] ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty”
-John Adams 

Praying for America

Praying for America.

Father God,
You have granted freedom to our land and you are worthy of praise.1 You placed in the hearts of our forefathers a desire to seek Your will through independence and freedom.

I pray for our continued independence and sovereignty as we look toward You. For the gifts our Declaration of Independence speak of, “life. liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” are granted by you alone.

May we be secure in our freedom,
but never take it for granted.
May we be free from slavery,
but be a servant to Your will.
May we be protected from oppression
as we extend the provision of liberty to others,
And may we speak with honor as we honor your Word.

May we, as Christian Patriots, heed the words of Paul, who wrote:
You, my brothers, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the sinful nature; rather, serve one another in love. (Galatians 5:13)

Bless those who serve our nation and have protected her shores.
Bring protection, honor and blessings to their households.

May we be a people whose freedom is a beacon to the world of Your grace,
and may we be forever reminded of Your hand in our deliverance.
AMEN.

_________
1 Psalm 145:3

________
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.

Photo Credits:
Original Prayer Photo by: khrawlings
Original Flag Photo and editing by: Joshua J Masters 

James Madison on the Kingdom of God

James Madison

This portrait of our fourth president and author of the Federalist Papers hangs in the White House. It serves as a reminder that our founding fathers rooted the creation of our nation in a loyalty to the greater Kingdom of God. In 1785 James Madison said:

“It is the duty of every man to render to the Creator such homage… Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe.”

Our first allegiance is to the God who provides the blessing of freedom in America and our greater freedom in Christ. He is the source of our liberty, he is the source of our greatness. Madison acknowledged the principle of duel citizenship. We are members of the American citizenry, but must first accept our role in the Kingdom of God. Otherwise, we will never truly understand or embrace the blessings He has bestowed on this nation.

What does it mean to have duel citizenship? How does it affect the way you see America?

.

_______
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.
Quote Source: America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations by William J. Federer, 
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Public Domain Collection

A Prayer for America (National Day of Prayer)

Praying for the nation.

Father God,
You are great and worthy of praise.1 I am grateful for the mercy you have conferred on the United States. You have promised to heal our land if we humble ourselves before you,2 and today we do so in a special day of prayer.

I join with the President in asking for your guidance, mercy and protection on our country. May my life be a reflection of President Monroe’s declaration of prayer, for he said:

“The liberty, prosperity, and happiness of our country will always be the object of my most fervent prayers to the Supreme Author of All Good.”

I thank you for the liberty and freedom you have bestowed on the United States. I lift up my president and his staff to you. May the Holy Spirit give them the gifts of both leadership and servitude.3 I do not know the struggles they face on a daily basis, but I pray for them to be encouraged and strengthened through a relationship with you.

I ask your blessing on American troops serving away from their loved ones, and for your comforting hand to be on the families awaiting their safe return.

I pray for the sovereignty of America. Give us the strength to stand with our allies, but the will to stand alone with You when necessary. Through seeking your will, may our sovereignty be a light to other nations and a hope to those in need.

Above all, teach us to be a nation dedicated to your Word. Teach us to pray for our leaders4 and seek your face. Teach us to pray for repentance as our forefather did, and may we never be a Christian nation by mere proclamation, but through our actions, mercy and compassion.
AMEN.

.

On this National day of Prayer, please consider praying for America on a regular basis. If you want to make a Declaration of Prayer for the next year, read “The Kingdom and a Nation” and visit “The First Prayer.” You can also check out the most recent installment of “America’s Weekly Prayer List” on this site. There’s also still time to find a National Day of Prayer event near you and participate. Here are some additional resources for your National Day of Prayer:
A Prayer for the President
A Prayer for Faith in America
A Prayer for Freedom in Christ for America
A Short Prayer of Sincerity
A Prayer from George Washington
A Prayer from Thomas Jefferson
Abraham Lincoln on Prayer

_________
1 Psalm 145:3
2 2 Chronicles 7:14
3 Romans 12:5-8
4 1 Timothy 2:1-2

________
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.

Photo Credits:
Original Prayer Photo by: khrawlings
Original Flag Photo and editing by: Joshua J Masters 

America’s Forefathers on the National Day of Prayer

“The Prayer at Valley Forge” by Arnold Friberg

As we begin preparations for tomorrow’s National Day of Prayer, it is important to remember the role prayer has played in American History. As we consider the Patriot Quotes below, be sure to find a National Day of Prayer event near you and participate. Also, be sure to visit this site on Thursday May 3 at 9:00am and read an original prayer for the nation.

Although the National Day of Prayer did not become an annual event until 1952 when President Truman signed a joint resolution of Congress, the idea of a National Day of Prayer and Fasting has actually existed longer than the nation itself. In 1775 the Continental Congress petitioned the people to pray as we formed our new country. Since then, many presidents have called the people of America to pray for the nation. Here are a few Patriot Quotes to inspire you during Tomorrow’s National Day of Prayer:

The Prayer at Valley Forge

Washington’s Prayer at Valley Forge, 
engraving by John C. McRae

There’s a great deal we can learn from George Washington’s personal prayer life, but he also made several declarations of national prayer and thanksgiving including this proclamation on January 1, 1795:

“It is in an especial manner our duty as a people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God, and to implore Him to continue and confirm the blessings we experienced.”

John Adams also called for a national day of prayer and fasting March 6, 1799:

“I have thought proper to recommend, and I hereby recommend accordingly, that Thursday, the twenty-fifth day of April next, be observed throughout the United States of America as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting and prayer; that the citizens on that day abstain, as far as may be, from their secular occupation, and devote the time to the sacred duties of religion, in public and in private; that they call to mind our numerous offenses against the most high God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore his pardoning mercy, through the Great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that through the grace of His Holy Spirit, we may be disposed and enabled to yield a more suitable obedience to his righteous requisitions in time to come; that He would interpose to arrest the progress of that impiety and licentiousness in principle and practice so offensive to Himself and so ruinous to mankind; that He would make us deeply sensible that ‘righteousness exalteth a nation but sin is a reproach to any people’ (Proverbs 14:34)”

After the Union Army was defeated at the Battle of Bull Run, President Lincoln declared a National Day of Prayer and Fasting September 26, 1861, saying:

“It is fit and becoming in all people, at all times, to acknowledge and revere the Supreme Government of God; to bow in humble submission to his chastisement; to confess and deplore their sins and transgressions in the full conviction that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom; and to pray, with all fervency and contrition, for the pardon of their past offenses, and for a blessing upon their present and prospective action…”

Two months after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, Abraham Lincoln called for another day of national prayer. His proclamation began:

“Whereas, the Senate of the United States devoutly recognizing the Supreme Authority and just government of Almighty God in all the affairs of men and of nations, has, by resolution, requested the President to designate and set apart a day for national prayer and humiliation…”

There are many more examples of our forefathers petitioning the nation for prayer. What’s important to remember from these brief examples is the importance prayer has played in the blessing of our nation. As we prepare to call out to God in one Christian voice tomorrow, pray for the healing of our nation and the wisdom of our leaders.

What activities do you have planned for the National Day of Prayer? How will you be praying for our nation?

.

_______
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.
Quotes Source: America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations by William J. Federer, 
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Public Domain Collection

A Prayer from George Washington

George Washington was a man of prayer and repentance. His prayer journals offer great lessons on how we, as Christian patriots, should be praying for America today:

Gilbert Stuart's Portrait of George Washington

Gilbert Stuart's Portrait of George Washington

“Almighty God; We make our earnest prayer that Thou wilt keep the United States in Thy Holy protection; and thou wilt incline the hearts of the Citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government; and entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another and for the fellow Citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the field.”

Consider some of the elements Washington includes in his prayer for America:

  • First, Washington acknowledges God’s sovereignty as the Almighty God.
  • He acknowledges our need for God’s hand of protection on America.
  • He asks for our citizens to have a changed heart toward government. This is not self-serving, but a command from God proclaimed in Romans 13:1, “Everyone must submit himself to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.”
  • He recognizes our need to love one another as Christ commanded and asks God to give Americans a heart of compassion.
  • Lastly, he acknowledges our need to support our troops. Washington makes special mention of their service and asks for the hearts of America to be turned toward those who serve our nation.
The common theme throughout Washington’s prayer is a desire to change our own hearts. We so often think of changing others when we pray for the nation, but we should pray for God to transform us into the change we want to see in America.

What strikes you about Washington’s prayer? How will it affect the way you pray for America?

.

_______
Please see the Condition of Use for this blog.
© Joshua J. Masters and American Psalms, 2012.
Quote Source: America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations by William J. Federer, 
Photo Credit: Wikimedia Public Domain Collection